7th CPC Order, OM, Report - Collection$type=ticker$count=12$cate=0

Analysis of Central Government Personnel: Seventh Pay Commission Report Chapter 3

Report of the Seventh Central Pay Commission

Chapter 3
Analysis of Central Government Personnel

3.1 The Seventh CPC has been mandated by its terms of reference to examine, review and recommend changes in the principles that govern the emoluments structure for a number of employees’ categories viz., Central Government employees, those belonging to All India Services, personnel of Union Territories, officers and employees of the Indian Audit and Accounts Department, Members of Regulatory Bodies, Officers and employees of the Supreme Court and personnel belonging to the Defence Forces. The focus of the Commission is primarily on personnel serving the Central Government. Therefore an essential aspect of the work of the Commission involved obtaining a clear picture of the size, composition and profile of Central Government personnel. 

Background

3.2 The III, IV and V CPCs undertook an analysis of the composition of Central Government personnel. The III CPC, in its Chapter titled ‘Employment under Central Government,’ analysed the distribution of posts among major departments; distribution of posts in terms of classes-I, II, III and IV (as was classified at that time); distribution of posts among permanent and temporary and distribution of employees according to pay ranges.
3.3 The IV CPC, in a separate Chapter titled ‘Civil Employment under the Central Government,’ analysed the strength of the civil Central Government broadly in terms of (a) distribution of posts in terms of major departments (b) distribution of posts in terms of groups-Group `A’, Group `B’, Group `C’ and Group `D’ (c) distribution of industrial workers in terms of major departments and (d) distribution of permanent and temporary posts by major departments.

3.4 The V CPC in its Chapter titled ‘Size of employment under Central Government’ analysed the strength of the civil Central Government broadly on the lines of the IV CPC, adding greater details. It concluded inter alia that the statistics did not provide pointers to whether “the bureaucracy as a whole is ‘bloated’ or not.” It did however note that the rate of growth had been arrested and that the government, if it had the will, could reduce manpower. It also supported the trend towards an officer oriented administration.

3.5 The VI CPC Report did not carry a separate analysis of Central Government personnel.

Approach of this Commission

3.6 The Commission decided to elicit data relating to personnel from all ministries/departments so as to get a comprehensive view on personnel serving the government in terms of certain broad attributes. To do so data on personnel position over time was sought along with their age profile. Further, in the context of implementation of the National Pension System w.e.f 01.01.2004, disaggregation in terms of those recruited before or after this event was sought. Information was also obtained regarding expenditure on pay and allowances of personnel working in the Central Government; extent of deployment of contractual staff and training and skill development of personnel. The data template in which information was sought is at Annex A, B, C, D1 and D2.
3.7 To ensure integrity of data the Commission validated the data on personnel with reference to other data sources in the government on personnel viz., - (a) Expenditure Budget, Volume 1, Annex 7 of the Ministry of Finance and (b) Census of government employees prepared by the Directorate General of Employment and Training, Ministry of Labour and Employment. While undertaking this exercise infirmities in data as and where noticed were reconciled in consultation with the ministries/departments. With regard to expenditure on personnel the ministries/departments were requested to furnish this data after having it vetted by their Chief Controller of Accounts.

Scope of Analysis

3.8 Based on the data received, an analysis has been undertaken by the Commission to bring out the existing position on Central Government civilian personnel and the pointers it provides to policy makers in the government.
Personnel who are included-
those in
Personnel who are excluded-those
Within the remit of
7 th CPC
Outside the Remit of 7 th CPC
> Ministries/Departments
> Attached Offices
> Subordinate Offices
* Defence Forces <> Autonomous Bodies/ Societies
<> Bodies receiving grants from the Consolidated Fund of India
<> Gramin Dak Sevaks in the Department of Posts
<> Public Sector Companies
3.9 The Commission has obtained data regarding 33.02 lakh Central Government civil personnel, in Civil Ministries/Departments, Defence (Civilians), Posts and Railways[The Commission estimates that the data received by it covers over 99 percent of all Central Government civilian personnel.]. The analysis includes 0.77 lakh personnel of Delhi Police, who are paid salaries from the Police grant of the Ministry of Home Affairs. A separate section has been added on contracted manpower in the government.

Defining a Central Government Employee


3.10 The III CPC had attempted to define who is a Central Government employee. It stated that “All persons in the civil services of the Central Government or holding civil posts under that government and paid out of the Consolidated Fund of India.

3.11 The Commission is in broad agreement with what has been stated in the III CPC Report.

For the purposes of its work, the Commission defines Central Government employees as all persons in the civil services of the Central Government or holding civil posts under that government and paid Salaries out of the Consolidated Fund of India. This however, does not include such persons appointed to serve Parliament or the Union Judiciary.

Views of Important Stakeholders on Central Government Personnel


3.12 The Commission has received representations/memoranda on issues that broadly involve the strength, deployment and expenditure on Central Government personnel.

3.13 Joint Consultative Machinery-Staff Side: On the size and nature of government, the JCM-Staff Side has made the following submissions to the Commission:

i. Majority of Central Government employees (88 percent) are either industrial or operational staff and therefore the contention that wage bill of the Central Government is for administrative purpose is ill conceived.

ii. Existence of a large array of personnel employed by the government through contract, pushing a major segment of government functions into informal sector.

iii. Expenditure on pay and allowances over the years as a percentage of revenue receipts and revenue expenditure has been falling.
 

Focus Areas of the Commission

3.14 Based on the data provided by the ministries/departments the Commission has examined and analysed trends with regard to five focus area:
1. Size of government- Sanctioned Strength and Persons in Position
2. Personnel in Position, in terms of categories
3. Personnel in Position, recruited before and on or after 01.01.2004
4. Age Profile of Central Government Personnel as on 01.01.2014
5. Expenditure on Pay and Allowances of Central Government Personnel

3.15 There is a separate Section devoted to Contractual Manpower in the Central Government.
3.16 To strike a balance between the two ends of aggregation and details, in addition to the broad totals, particulars of the nine largest ministries/departments plus others has been included in each Section. In addition, wherever appropriate, instances of some outliers in each category have been brought out.

Size of Government- Sanctioned Strength and Persons in Position

3.17 The Commission has received data from ministries/departments on the strength of personnel in the government at three points of time viz., 01.01.2006, 01.01.2010 and 01.01.2014. The data on strength of personnel in government has been reviewed and material from successive CPC Reports have been put together to bring out the position as has evolved over time.

Sanctioned Strength of Government over time

3.18 The IV and V CPC Reports provide a picture on the size of the government starting from 1957. With the data available the Commission is able to present a picture on the sanctioned strength of the Central Government, spanning a 57 year time frame from 1957 to 2014.
Total Sanctioned Strength
(in lakh)
1957
1971
1984
1994
2006
2014
17.37
29.82
37.87
41.76
37.01
38.90

3.19 Since the particulars of sanctioned strength available till 1994 excludes Union Territories (UTs), for purposes of consistency, the strength shown, in this paragraph, for the years 2006 and 2014 also excludes UTs.

3.20 The break-up of the total sanctioned strength of the Central Government personnel in terms of principal ministries/departments of the government during the period 1957 to 2014 is depicted in the graph below.
sanctioned+strength
Notes: (i) Data upto 1994 from V CPC Report (ii) Data on ‘Others’ excludes personnel in Union
Territories for purpose of consistency (iii) For the year 2006, in absence of data from Ministry of Health, data provided for the year 2014 has been adopted.

3.21 The data in the table/graph points to the following:

i. Steady increase till 1994: The sanctioned strength of personnel in the Central Government increased significantly from 17.37 lakh in 1957 to 29.82 lakh in 1971. The pace of growth slowed thereafter with the sanctioned strength increasing to 37.87 lakh in 1984 and 41.76 lakh in 1994.

ii. Corporatisation after 1994: Some reduction in sanctioned strength of personnel has been witnessed after 1994- it came down to 37.01 lakh in 2006. The decline subsequent to 1994 has been on account of the corporatisation in the telecommunications sector and creation of the PSU Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited.

iii. Decline in strength of Railways, Communications: The personnel strength of the Railways, which accounted for 57 percent of total sanctioned strength in 1957, gradually declined to 40 percent in 2014. Defence Civilian and Communications segments have also witnessed decline in their share during the period.

iv. Sharp increase in ‘Others’: The category ‘Others’ has witnessed a sharp growth in sanctioned strength from 2.82 lakh in 1957 to 14.94 lakh in 2014. The significant contributor to this growth has been increase in strength under the Ministry of Home Affairs from 3.25 lakh in 1984 to 9.72 lakh in 2014.

3.22 The Ministry wise particulars of sanctioned strength, persons in position and vacancies as on 01.01.2014 has been detailed in Annex-1.

Persons in Position with Reference to Sanctioned Strength

3.23 The total number of regular civilian employees and their distribution in major departments of the Central Government (including Union Territories) in the years 2006, 2010 and 2014 is as follows:
Table 1: Sanctioned Strength and Persons in Position
(in lakh)
Sl.
No.
Ministry/
Department
01.01.2006
01.01.2010
01.01.2014
Sanctioned
Strength
Persons
in
Position
Sanctioned
Strength
Persons
in
Position
Sanctioned
Strength
Persons
in
Position
1. Railways
15.97
14.12
15.65
13.71
15.51
13.16
2. MHA incl.CAPF#
8.02
7.44
9.29
8.13
10.56
9.80
3. Defence (Civil)
6.05
4.51
5.88
4.20
5.85
3.98
4. Posts
2.60
2.18
2.55
1.96
2.50
1.90
5. Revenue
1.34
1.05
1.35
1.03
1.76
0.96
6. IA&AD#
0.66
0.49
0.67
0.45
0.68
0.48
7. Urban Development
0.48
0.37
0.42
0.30
0.43
0.31
8. Atomic Energy
0.36
0.33
0.37
0.32
0.37
0.32
9. Health*
0.29
0.21
0.29
0.21
0.29
0.21
10. Others
2.48
2.04
2.46
1.99
2.52
1.90
Total
38.25
32.74
38.92
32.31
40.49
33.02
#MHA- Ministry of Home Affairs, IA&AD–Indian Audit and Accounts Department
*Ministry of Health has provided data only for the year 2014. For consistency these figures have been adopted for the years 2006 and 2010.

3.24 One of the notable aspects of the present deployment of Central Government personnel is that security related entities (Ministry of Home Affairs/Police and Defence Civilians) form a large part of civilian employment at 13.78 lakh as on 01.01.2014. Railways and Posts performing a commercial function employ another 15.06 lakh personnel. The total Central Government employment other than those in security related or commercial departments, as on 01.01.2014 is 4.18 lakh. In fact the number of personnel working in the Secretariat of ministries/departments, after excluding independent/statutory entities, attached and subordinate offices will add up to less than thirty thousand{ The strength of CSS (Directors, Under Secretaries, Section Officers, Assistants), CSSS (PPS, PS, Stenographers), CSCS (LDC and UDC) etc. in September 2015 was 23,860. Added to it would be about 1500 officers in the posts of Secretaries/Additional Secretaries/Joint Secretaries, Directors and Deputy Secretaries under the Central Staffing Scheme. Some technical posts also exist in a few ministries/ departments.}. The ‘core’ of the government, so to say, is actually very small for the Government of India, taken as a whole.

3.25 Table 1 further indicates the following:
i. Persons in position as a percentage of sanctioned strength has fallen from 86 percent in 2006 to 83 percent in 2010 and to 82 percent in 2014.
ii. During the period 2006 to 2014 every major ministry/department witnessed a decline in persons in position, with the exception of MHA/Police. The total strength of the Ministry of Home Affairs witnessed an increase from 7.44 lakh to 9.80 lakh constituting a growth of 32 percent.
iii. Excluding Ministry of Home Affairs, the persons in position in the Central Government declined from 25.29 lakh in 2006 to 24.18 lakh in 2010 and further to 23.21 lakh in 2014.
3.26 The Ministry wise particulars of persons in position and changes thereon during the period 2006 to 2014 are detailed in Annex 2.

International Comparisons

3.27 The size of Central Government across countries is not readily available on a comparable basis. One large country which has a federal structure for which comparable information is available is the USA.
Size and Deployment of Personnel: USA and India
3.28 Available literature indicates that the size of the non-postal civilian workforce for the US Federal Government in the year 2012 was 21.30 lakh{ Report of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) on Federal Workforce- Recent Trends in Federal Civilian Employment and Compensation, January 2014.}. This includes civilians working in US defence establishments. The corresponding persons in position in India for the Central Government in 2014 was 17.96 lakh{ Strength of Railways and Posts have been reduced from the total PIP of 33.02 lakh.}. The total number of federal/Central Government personnel per lakh of population in India and the US works out to 139 and 668 respectively{ As per the World Bank data, in 2014 the population of India and the USA was 129.50 crore and 31.89 crore respectively.}.
3.29 Data from the US Office of Personnel Management, indicates that a few departments accounted for a large percentage of non-postal civilian employment in the US Federal Government. The Department of Defence, Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Homeland Security and Department of Treasury accounted for 34, 15, 9 and 5 percent respectively of US federal non-postal civilian workforce.

3.30 Deployment of Central Government personnel (excluding Railways and Posts) in India, showed an even more pronounced concentration. Three departments namely Ministry of Home Affairs, Defence Civilians and Revenue accounted for 55, 22 and 5 percent respectively of the total persons in position as on 01.01.2014.

Growth over an Eight Year Period

3.31 In case of USA, during the eight year period 2004 through 2012 the non-postal civilian work force grew by 2.5 lakh from 18.8 lakh to 21.3 lakh, representing an increase of 13 percent. In case of India, we have considered an eight year period 2006 to 2014 and it has been observed that non-postal/non-Railways workforce grew from 16.4 lakh to 18 lakh, representing an increase of 10 percent.
3.32 In the US, three Agencies, namely (i) Department of Defence (ii) Department of Homeland Security and (iii) Department of Veteran Affairs accounted for 94 percent of the growth in the federal workforce during the period 2004-2012. In India, the growth of Central Government personnel from 16.4 lakh to 18 lakh during period from 2006-2014 was under the Ministry of Home Affairs, essentially increase in Police.

Summary

3.33 The above points to the following:

a. The size of the Central Government in India, in terms of personnel per lakh of population at 139 was much lower than the US where the corresponding figure is 668.

b. In the US as well as in India, there is a concentration of personnel in a handful of departments, more so in India.

Reasons for Steady Decline in PIP in Recent Years

3.34 The primary reason for the steady decline in the personnel strength of the Central Government, other than in Ministry of Home Affairs/Police, are the guidelines issued by the Department of Personnel and Training in May 2001 on optimisation of direct recruitment to civilian posts, which were in operation from May 2001 to March 2009. As per these guidelines fresh recruitment was to be restricted to one percent of total civilian staff strength and with three percent of staff retiring each year the manpower reduced by two percent per annum. The objective was to achieve a reduction of 10 percent in staff strength in five years.
3.35 The impact of the instructions on optimisation of direct recruitment to civilian posts was reviewed in the Report of the VI CPC. It made the following recommendations in para 6.3.10 of its report: “The Commission has recommended multi skilling of the government employees which would increase their operational efficiency while simultaneously optimising the staff strength. It is, however, noted that while rightsizing in government is necessary given the changes in work process due to technology and consequent reduction of layers, a blanket ban on filling of vacant posts across the board can impact effective functioning. More flexibility is required in this policy for effective service delivery and care has to be taken that administrative delivery structures do not become hollow or thin in critical areas. It is, therefore, essential that the government revise the Annual Direct Recruitment Plan (ADRP) in terms of which only one third of the vacancies can be filled up. This instruction has resulted in an aging bureaucracy which does not easily adapt itself to technology. An active and younger profile in government employment is the need of the hour. Further, strengthening of the cutting edge for efficient delivery is required. New guidelines, where reduction in manpower and levels of fresh manpower intake would be assessed and prioritized by the individual ministry or department keeping its work processes, service delivery and functional requirements and budgetary savings at centre stage should, therefore, be issued.

3.36 Based on this the government decided, in 2009, not to extend the Optimisation Scheme.

Quantum of Recruitment

3.37 The Commission has reviewed the recruitment levels in the Central Government during the period 01.01.2006 to 01.01.2014 and the summary position of this review is as under:
Table 2: Post 01.01.2004 Recruitment
Sl.
No.
Name of Ministry/
Department
As on
01.01.2006
As on
01.01.2010
As on
01.01.2014
Recruitment
between
2006-2010
Recruitment
between 2010-
2014
Recruitment
between 2006-
2014
1
Railways
65,288
1,55,917
3,96,260
90,629
2,40,343
3,30,972
2
MHA including Police
1,02,773
2,42,799
4,65,959
1,40,026
2,23,160
3,63,186
3
Defence (Civil)
38,853
62,094
1,02,303
23,241
40,209
63,450
4
Posts
21,220
29,679
52,263
8,459
22,584
31,043
5
Revenue
6,281
17,913
31,350
11,632
13,438
25,070
6
IA&AD
781
2,417
12,297
1,636
9,880
11,516
7
Urban Development
272
807
3,980
535
3,173
3,708
8
Atomic Energy
3,211
6,681
9,999
3,470
3,318
6,788
9
Health
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Total of Major ministries/ departments
2,38,679
5,18,307
10,74,411
2,79,625
5,56,104
8,35,733
10
Others
16,886
24,197
38,917
7,314
14,721
22,031
Grand Total
2,55,565
5,42,504
11,13,328
2,86,939
5,70,825
8,57,764

3.38 From Table 2 it is evident that the recruitment of civil Central Government personnel rose sharply from 2.87 lakh in the four year period 2006-2010 to 5.71 lakh in the four year period 2010 to 2014. Railways and Police with a total recruitment of 4.63 lakh during the period 2010 to 2014 accounted for 81 percent of all new civilian recruits in the Central Government. While no causality can be established between recruitment during the period 01.01.2010 and 01.01.2014 compared to the period 01.01.2006 and 01.01.2010 and the withdrawal of orders on the Optimisation Scheme, it is notable that recruitment in the period after 01.01.2010 has been significantly higher.

3.39 The Commission notes that on an average the intake of new civilian recruits in the Central Government during the period 2006 to 2014 has been slightly over a lakh each year. The Report of the ‘Working Group on Labour Force and Employment Projections’ constituted for the  Eleventh Five Year Plan estimated that during the period 2012-17 the labour force is projected to increase by 4.46 crore, which translates to an average increase each year of over 89 lakh. This suggests that the Central Government is at best a marginal source for employment generation. The quantum of intake of fresh personnel by the Central Government is an insignificant percentage of the total entrants in India’s labour force.
3.40 Recruiting Agencies: The data from ministries/departments with regard to recruitments on or after 01.01.2004 suggests that certain departments which undertake recruitment through their own dedicated Boards/Agencies have shown recruitments of larger numbers. Examples include Railways, Departments of Posts, Atomic Energy, Space etc.

3.41 The Commission has not obtained data on the skill profile of Central Government employees. It, however, notes that based on the medium term goals and priorities of the government, a determination of skills and competencies required to meet them, needs to be made across Central Government ministries/departments. This will have implications both for recruitment policy as well as the size and composition of the government.

Variation in Persons in Position as per Sources Reporting Data on Personnel

3.42 The V CPC, in its Chapter titled ‘Size of employment under Central Government,’ pointed to the varied sources that reported on size of the civilian Central Government employees together with the fact that “these sources were often dated, not sufficiently comprehensive, incognate and yield conflicting results. The examination by this Commission of the existing data sources confirms the conclusions arrived at by the V CPC.
3.43 The data received from ministries/departments on the strength of personnel was validated with reference to two sources of data in the government on personnel- (a) Expenditure Budget, Volume 1, Annex 7 of the Ministry of Finance and (b) Census of government employees prepared by the Directorate General of Employment and Training (DGET), Ministry of Labour and Employment. The examination of data confirms the view of the V CPC regarding the quality of data. As an illustration, the position in respect of some ministries/departments where the variation is substantial has been brought out below together with the reasons, arrived at, after review of the numbers.
Table 3: Variation in Reported Data
Sl. No.
Ministry/ Department
As per Expenditure Budget (Actuals for 2014)
As per DGET (2011)
As per data obtained by 7 th CPC (01.01.2014)
Remarks
1
Ministry of Defence (Civil)
34,483
3,75,309
3,98,422
Expenditure Budget data widely understates the actual numbers
2
Department of Posts
4,59,948
2,09,047
1,89,771
Expenditure Budget data included data on Gramin Dak Sevaks and hence not a like comparison.
3
Ministry of External Affairs
10,433
6,398
3,037
Expenditure Budget data overstated on account of inclusion of personnel in Autonomous Bodies
4
Ministry of Commerce and Industry
9,223
5,345
3,771
Expenditure Budget data overstated on account of inclusion of personnel in Autonomous Bodies and PSUs.

3.44 While the data of Directorate General of Employment and Training is a closer approximation of the actuals of personnel as obtained and verified by the Commission, it is dated. In the case of data on personnel in the Expenditure Budget, available each year, the variation in numbers with the actuals as obtained by the Commission is substantial, as Table 3 testifies.

3.45 To ensure integrity and availability of consistent data on personnel in the government, the Commission is of the view that the database on personnel needs to be standardised on an IT platform, across all civil ministries/departments. This will facilitate ease in compilation, aggregation and make reliable data readily available to concerned stakeholders.

Persons in Position in Terms of Categories: Groups A, B and C

3.46 All Central Government civil posts of the Union are categorised under the Central Civil Services (Classification, Control and Appeal) Rules, 1965. There are currently three categories of Central Government personnel–Group `A’, Group `B’ and Group `C’. This categorisation is made by the government based on the pay band and grade pay or the pay scales as applicable.
3.47 The data provided by the ministries/departments is consolidated in terms of the three categories of personnel as per Table 4.
Table 4: Groupwise Distribution of Personnel
Sl.
No
Ministry/
Department
Persons in
Position as on
01.01.2014
Group
`A’
Group `B’
Group `C’
1.
Railways
13,15,688
8,493
7,283
12,99,912
(<1)
(<1)
(99)
2.
MHA incl. CAPFs
9,80,114
16,090
60,162
9,03,862
(2)
(6)
(92)
3.
Defence (Civil)
3,98,422
17,160
59,415
3,21,847
(4)
(15)
(81)
4.
Posts
1,89,771
527
6,826
1,82,418
(<1)
(4)
(96)
5.
Revenue
95,812
5827
40,907
49,078
(6)
(43)
(51)
6.
IA&AD
48,164
605
32,105
15,454
(1)
(67)
(32)
7.
Urban Development
30,665
1539
6967
22159
(5)
(23)
(72)
8.
Atomic Energy
32,330
8,515
12,404
11,411
(27)
(38)
(35)
9.
Health
21,061
2997
4972
13092
(14)
(24)
(62)
10.
Others
1,89,509
29,748
49,851
1,09,910
Total
33,01,536
91,501
2,80,892
29,29,143
3.48 The five ministries/departments with largest percentage in Group `A’ are listed in the Table 5. These ministries/departments are not depicted individually in Table 4.
Table 5: Largest Population in Group A
Name of Ministry/ Department
Total in Group
`A’
Total Personnel in
Position (PIP)
%age of PIP in
Group `A’
Space
8555
15011
57
Electronics and IT
5260
3004
57
New and Renewable Energy
80
187
43
Civil Aviation
396
977
41
External Affairs
1130
3037
37
3.49 Tables 4 and 5 bring out the following:
i. Of the total 33.02 lakh civilian workforce 89 percent are in Group `C’, 8 percent are in Group `B’ and 3 percent are in Group `A’.

ii. While 89 percent of civilian Central Government personnel are in Group `C’, the Railways, Department of Posts and MHA have a significantly higher proportion in Group `C’ at 99 percent, 96 percent and 92 percent respectively.

iii. Scientific and technical focused ministries/departments have a high percentage of Group `A’ Officers.
3.50 The Ministry-wise particulars of composition of personnel in terms of Group `A’, `B’ and `C’ are detailed in Annex 4
3.51 The Commission notes that in addition to details on composition of personnel in terms of the Group `A’, `B’ and `C’ it would be useful, both for purposes of management information and decision making, if reliable data on personnel in terms of job families is collected.

Personnel in Position, Recruited Before or on or After 01.01.2004

3.52 About a decade back the government notified the defined contribution National Pension System which became effective for all employees entering Central Government on or after 01.01.2004, except those in the three defence forces. Thus, as on date, there are two categories of serving civil Central Government personnel - those covered by the earlier defined benefits scheme- viz., pre 01.01.2004 appointees and those covered by the defined contribution scheme viz., those appointed on or after 01.01.2004 (post 01.01.2004 recruits).
3.53 The data provided by the ministries/departments, consolidated in terms of pre and post 01.01.2004 personnel, is indicated in Table 6. (This does not include personnel of the three defence forces)
Table 6: Post 01.01.2004 Recruits
Sl. No.
Ministry/
Department
Persons in
Position as on
01.01.2014
(in lakh)
Pre
01.01.2004
recruits
(in lakh)
Post
01.01.2004
recruits
(in lakh)
Post
01.01.2004
recruits as a
%age of PIP
1.
Railways
13.16
9.20
3.96
30
2.
MHA incl. CAPFs
9.80
5.14
4.66
48
3.
Defence (Civil)
3.98
2.96
1.02
26
4.
Posts
1.90
1.38
0.52
27
5.
Revenue
0.96
0.65
0.31
32
6.
IA&AD
0.48
0.36
0.12
25
7.
Urban Development
0.31
0.27
0.04
13
8.
Atomic Energy
0.32
0.22
0.10
31
9.
Health
0.21
0.20
0.01
5
10.
Others
1.90
1.50
0.40
21
Total
33.02
21.88
11.14
34

i. Of the total 11.14 lakh post 01.01.2004 recruits, Ministry of Home Affairs, Railways, Defence (Civilians) and Posts accounted for 10.16 lakh recruits.

ii. All other departments accounted for 0.98 lakh new recruits- about 9 percent of all new recruits.

3.54 Post 01.01.2004 Recruits and Defined Contribution Pension: For all civil recruits in the Central Government recruited on or after 01.01.2004, the government and the employee each make a ten percent contribution of the basic pay and dearness allowance towards the pension fund accumulation of the employee. The government contribution{ Excluding Railways.} for the defined contribution pension scheme has been 924 crore in 2011-12, 1,200 crore in 2012-13 and 1,600 crore in 2013-14 respectively.

Age Profile of Central Government Personnel as on 01.01.2014

3.55 With a view to determining the age profile of personnel serving in the Central Government, this Commission obtained data of its personnel from each ministry/department in terms of distinct age groups viz., those less than 20 years, 20-30 years, 30-40 years, 40 to 50 years, 50-60 years and over 60 years.
3.56 Aggregate Position: Of the total 33.02 lakh persons in position as on 01.01.2014, the break up in various age groups is indicated in the pie chart below.

age+profile


Note: ‘Others’ accounts for those below 20 years and over 60 years of age.

3.57 Disaggregate Position: While at an aggregate level, which covers all persons in position in the government, the distribution of personnel in various age groups is quite even, this picture changes significantly when the data is analysed at a disaggregate level. In terms of the breakup of personnel amongst the largest ministries/departments in terms of age the graph below brings out the position.

age+group+percentage

# In the age groups, Others includes those below 20 years and over 60 years of age.

i. The composition of personnel in the age groups 20-30 years and 30-40 years is very substantial amongst personnel in MHA.
ii. Larger departments like Railways, MHA (Police), Posts and IA&AD had relatively larger percentages in the 20-30 years age group compared to other ministries which comprise the rest of the smaller ministries/departments of the government.

3.58 Pattern with regard to smaller ministries/departments: On an analysis of the age composition of personnel, the Commission noted a discernible pattern as regards ministries/ departments which were comparatively smaller. A review of all ministries/departments with persons in positions (PIP) less than 500 was undertaken. The findings pointed to the fact that in most of these ministries/departments the percentage of personnel in the age group 20-30 years was significantly lower than in the larger departments in the government.

Table 7: Percentage of Personnel in Various Age Groups
{ Those below 20 years and above 60 years of age are not included.}
Ministry/Department
Total
PIP
(Age Groups)
20-30
30-40
40-50
50-60
Drinking Water and Sanitation
78
14.1
17.9
29.5
38.5
Panchayati Raj
82
3.7
26.8
31.7
37.8
Food Processing Industries
114
3.5
11.4
37.7
47.4
Overseas Indian Affairs
118
4.2
17.8
30.5
47.5
Parliamentary Affairs
123
7.3
21.1
32.5
35.0
Minority Affairs
148
7.4
16.9
32.4
37.8
AYUSH
164
6.1
12.2
30.5
51.2
New and Renewable Energy
187
7.0
12.8
28.3
51.9
Tribal Affairs
197
7.6
19.3
32.0
41.1
Steel
210
2.4
23.8
38.1
35.7
Petroleum and Natural Gas
230
1.7
12.2
26.1
60.0
Central Vigilance Commission
232
10.8
25.9
40.5
22.8
Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
246
4.1
9.8
30.1
56.1
Development of NER
259
9.3
15.4
30.5
43.6
Youth Affairs and Sports
281
5.7
28.8
18.9
44.1
Coal
305
3.6
6.5
25.6
64.3
Rural Development
476
3.8
13.4
38.7
44.1
Social Justice and Empowerment
492
6.1
26.6
28.4
38.6
Tourism
500
2.8
14.4
65.2
17.6
3.59 Personnel in Age Group of 50 to 60: With a view to ascertaining the retirements that would take place in the coming few years the Commission reviewed the data for all ministries/departments in the age group of 50 to 60 years. Of the total 33.02 lakh persons in position, as on 01.01.2014, 9.48 lakh persons, constituting about 29 percent of personnel were in the age group of 50 to 60 years.
3.60 Table 8 brings out the position in this regard amongst the largest ministries/departments.
Table 8: Proportion of Personnel in 50-60 Age Group
Sl.
No.
Ministry/Department
PIP as on
01.01.2014
(in lakh)
PIP in the age
group of 50-60
(in lakh)
%age of 50-60
age group in PIP
1.
Railways
13.16
4.94
38
2.
MHA incl. CAPFs
9.80
0.68
7
3.
Defence (Civil)
3.98
1.51
38
4.
Posts
1.90
0.79
42
5.
Revenue
0.96
0.33
34
6.
IA&AD
0.48
0.16
33
7.
Urban Development
0.31
0.19
62
8.
Atomic Energy
0.32
0.11
34
9.
Health
0.21
0.07
33
10.
Others
1.86
0.70
38
Total *
32.98
9.48
29

* Total of PIP in Table 8 is marginally different from PIP in other tables since data on age groups was not furnished by a few ministries/departments.

3.61 Data provided to the Commission indicates an unusually large percentage of personnel in the 50-60 years age group in certain ministries/departments- 75 percent in Textiles, 64 percent in Coal, 62 percent in Urban Development, 60 percent in Petroleum and Natural Gas, 57 percent in Science and Technology, 56 percent in Heavy Industry, 52 percent in New and Renewable Energy, 51 percent in AYUSH and 50 percent in Power. This is a ready pointer to the number of retirements that would take place in the next ten years.

3.62 The Ministry wise particulars of age profile of personnel as on 01.01.2014 is detailed in Annex 5.

3.63 The Commission notes that losing experienced high level personnel entails unquantifiable costs as new recruits will require training and on the job skills. At the same time it presents ministries/departments the opportunity to align their personnel requirement in line with their current and future challenges.

Expenditure on Pay and Allowances on Central Government Personnel

3.64 Expenditure on pay and allowances of Central Government personnel is specifically budgeted and accounted for in the books of the government under the head ‘Salaries’ in the case of all civil ministries/departments. To ensure integrity of data on expenditure, all ministries/departments were requested to ensure that the data being provided was vetted by their Chief Controller of Accounts.
3.65 The total expenditure on pay and allowances for civil personnel of Central Government in the recent years is brought out in Table 9.
Table 9: Expenditure on Pay and Allowances
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Amount ( crore)
51,664
80,110
1,07,402
1,07,550
1,17,565
1,29,599
As a percent of GDP13
1.04
1.42
1.66
1.38
1.33
1.30
The Commission has obtained details of expenditure from each ministry/department for up to FY 2012-13. Of the total expenditure on pay and allowances of 1,29,599 crore for the financial year 2012-13 the break up in terms of the principal ministries/departments is brought out in Table 10.

Table 10: Per Capita Expenditure of Pay and Allowances
Sl.
No.
Ministry/
Department
PIP as on
01.01.2014
(in lakh)
Total Expenditure
Per Capita Expenditure
Percentage of PIP- Group wise
on Pay and
Allowances in
FY 2012-13
( crore)
on Pay and
Allowances in
FY 2012-13
( lakh)
A
B
C
1.
Railways
13.16
55,038
4.18
<1
<1
99
2.
MHA incl. CAPFs
9.80
29,076
2.97
2
6
92
3.
Defence (Civil)
3.98
12,888
3.24
4
15
81
4.
Posts
1.90
7,730
4.07
<1
4
96
5.
Revenue
0.96
4,894
5.10
6
43
51
6.
IA&AD
0.48
2,317
4.83
1
67
32
7.
Urban Development
0.31
1,112
3.59
5
23
72
8.
Atomic Energy
0.32
2,107
6.58
27
38
35
9.
Health
0.21
1,414
6.73
14
24
62
10.
Others
1.90
13,023
6.85
16
26
58
Total
33.02
1,29,599
3.92
3
9
88

3.66 The expenditure per capita on pay and allowances for civil Central Government personnel for FY 2012-13 was 3.9214 lakh per annum. {Per capita expenditure figure will be marginally lower since, as per the Commission’s estimate, the coverage of personnel is around 99 percent.}

3.67 Five ministries/departments with highest per capita expenditure on Pay and Allowances.

Table 11:Ministries with Highest Per Capita Expenditure on Pay and Allowances
Ministry/ Department
Persons in
Position as
on
01.01.2014
Total
Expenditure
on Pay and
Allowances in
FY 2012-13
( crore)
Per Capita
Expenditure on
Pay and
Allowances in
FY 2012-13
( lakh)
Percentage in Groups
A
B
C
1.
External Affairs#
3,037
1061.45
34.95
37
38
25
2.
New and Renewable Energy
187
19.91
10.65
43
19
38
3.
Food Processing
114
9.46
8.29
37
26
37
4.
Electronics and IT
5,260
404.31
7.70
57
27
16
5.
Power
1,044
77.49
7.42
31
30
39
# Inclusive of salaries and allowances paid abroad hence distinct from others.

3.68 Data on expenditure on pay and allowances for personnel clearly points to a positive relationship between ministries/departments with most of workforce in Group `A’ and the per capita expenditure on pay and allowances.

Expenditure on Pay and Allowances: Issues for Review

3.69 With regard to expenditure on pay and allowances for personnel in the Central Government two issues merit specific mention and the Commission is recommending review of existing arrangements in this regard.

3.70 Gramin Dak Sevaks: Examination of the existing classification of expenditure provisions of the Department of Posts reveals that expenditure on personnel in respect of pay and allowances of regular Central Government personnel serving in the department as well as that of Gramin Dak Sevaks are clubbed together under the head ‘Salaries.’ Since Gramin Dak Sevaks are not reckoned as Central Government personnel, expenditure on pay and allowances of this category of personnel should be distinct from regular Central Government personnel.
The Commission accordingly recommends that the Department of Posts budget and account for remuneration of Gramin Dak Sevaks under a head distinct from ‘Salaries,’ as they are not reckoned as Central Government employees.

3.71 Expenditure on Allowances: At present substantial amount of expenditure is being incurred by the Central Government on payment of Allowances to its personnel. Allowances however are not being separately budgeted or accounted for in the books of the Central Government- they are subsumed in the head “Salaries.” This applies to Civil Ministries, Railways, Defence Services and Posts. Hence the expenditure on Allowances as is available in some documents like the Expenditure Budget or in publications of the Pay Research Unit (PRU) is at best an approximation. There is a need for transparent and reliable data on Allowances to be available in public domain. For the purposes of transparency and availability of information in the public domain, the Commission recommends that a separate Object head may be created to capture expenditure on Allowances- in Civil, Defence, Railways and Posts.

Contractual Manpower in Government

3.72 The General Financial Rules provide for outsourcing of services in the interest of economy and efficiency. Broad guidance is provided in the Rules on identification of contractors and the tendering process.
There are three kinds of contractual appointments:
i. Tasks of a routine nature, typically those relating to housekeeping, maintenance, related activities, data entry, driving, and so on, which are normally bundled and entrusted to agencies. These agencies then depute the necessary persons to carry out these tasks.

ii. The VI CPC had recommended introduction of contractual appointments for selected posts, particularly those requiring high professional skills. Under this, suitable persons from outside could be inducted in the government on negotiated salaries/emoluments.

iii. The third category relates to retirees from government, whose skills, expertise, knowledge that was acquired while in government service is found to be useful to government, and therefore the services of such persons are taken on a contractual basis for varying lengths of time.

3.73 The Commission had through its Questionnaire sought the views of all stakeholders regarding their experience with outsourcing at various levels in the government and whether there existed a case for streamlining it. The Commission also sought to ascertain if there existed a clear identification of jobs that can be outsourced.

3.74 Response of Ministries on Contractual Manpower: The response received by the Commission on the issue of outsourcing from ministries/departments has been a mixed one. The Department of Personnel and Training has stated that with the removal of the category of Group D employees, those existing therein were to be moved up to Group `C’ cadre through a process of training. Therefore unskilled functions in the government sector would be contracted from outsources. The Ministry of Defence stated that the experience of outsourcing in conservancy services and transport had been quite good. The Department of Atomic Energy while supporting outsourcing, recommended that a standard operating procedure may be introduced through legislative means to enable outsourcing for routine activities like maintenance, transport services, canteen services etc. through professional agencies so as to avoid legal complications and exploitation of persons who have been taken on contract. The Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT) also supported outsourcing, though it felt the need for effecting some streamlining. The Ministry of AYUSH also supported outsourcing of routine administrative works.

3.75 On the other hand, there were a number of ministries/departments whose support for outsourcing was qualified. The Department of Posts stated that outsourcing in core operation was not suitable since outsourced manpower keep on changing frequently and it is difficult to train them. They were, however, not against outsourcing for housekeeping, maintenance related activities, driving staff and secretarial assistance. The Department of Economic Affairs was strongly against outsourcing and stated that it should be used in the rarest of rare case for duties of a peripheral nature. They were clearly against outsourcing of data processing. They, however, did feel that in the more commonplace functions the experience of outsourcing has been good. The Ministry of Power stated that outsourcing could only temporarily supplement the requirements of government. They noted their concerns with regard to confidentiality and accountability of outsourced personnel. However, jobs of drivers, multi-level tasking staff and DEO could be outsourced on need basis. The National Informatics Centre (NIC) was also against outsourcing stating that it entailed duplication of work done by regular employees.

3.76 Views of JCM-Staff Side: The JCM-Staff Side has, in its memorandum to the Commission, strongly opposed outsourcing stating that the existence of a large array of personnel employed by the government through contractors is pushing a major segment of government functions into the informal sector.

3.77 Nature of Deployment: The Commission had sought from all ministries/departments information with regard to remuneration levels of contacted manpower to ascertain the level of work being assigned to them. In most ministries/departments that have provided information, it is evident that the nature of jobs being contracted out were of a routine nature, involving a low level of remuneration. However Department of Electronics and Information Technology did engage a fair number of contractual personnel at higher levels of remuneration.{Remuneration of over 50,000 per month per person.} Railways and Ministry of Home Affairs also reported deployment of some contract personnel with higher remuneration.

3.78 Expenditure on Contractual Manpower: The Commission also sought information from all ministries/departments on expenditure towards engagement of contractual manpower. The information provided is brought out in Table 12.

Table 12: Annual Expenditure on Contractual Manpower
( in crore)
Sl. No.
Name of Ministry/ Departments
Annual Expenditure on
Contractual Manpower

(F.Y. 2012-13)
1
Railways
34.94
2
Police incl. CAPFs
25.72
3
Posts
19.55
4
IA&AD
28.47
5
Urban Development
0.99
6
Atomic Energy
9.93
7
Health
26.90
8
Others
153.99
Total
300.49

3.79 While the expenditure incurred on contractual manpower is relatively small compared to expenditure on Salaries of personnel serving in the government, they are in their own right significant and also likely to increase in the coming years. This warrants streamlining the existing regime governing outsourcing of contracted manpower, as has also been suggested by some ministries.

3.80 The responses and data received by the Commission suggests that there is a general consensus that routine administrative jobs in the government can continue to be outsourced.
In this regard the Commission is of the view that a clear guidance from the government on jobs that can and should be contracted out would be appropriate. While doing so the concerns of confidentiality and accountability may be kept in view. Further, to bring about continuity and to address the concerns regarding exploitation of contractual manpower, uniform guidelines/model contract agreements may be devised by the government.

3.81 Earlier in this chapter the fact that in a number of ministries/departments a large percentage of personnel will be retiring in the near future has been brought out. Loss of experienced high level personnel can entail unquantifiable costs as new recruits will require investment in terms of training, mentoring etc. In this light utilisation of retiring personnel with suitable skill sets can also be considered.

3.82 The Commission is also of the view that a database should be available with the government which can enable it to draw upon high level retiring personnel, who have the required capabilities to be utilised through contractual appointments.

Conclusions and Recommendations

3.83 The following are the conclusions and recommendations:
i. The Commission notes that based on the medium term goals and priorities of the government, a determination of skills and competencies required to meet them, needs to be made across Central Government ministries/departments. This will have implications both for recruitment policy as well as the size and composition of the government.

ii. To ensure integrity and availability of consistent data on personnel in the government, the Commission is of the view that the database on personnel needs to be standardised on an IT platform, across all civil ministries/departments. This will facilitate ease in compilation, aggregation and make reliable data readily available to concerned stakeholders.

iii. The Commission notes that in addition to details on composition of personnel in terms of the Group `A’, `B’ and `C’ it would be useful both for purposes of management information and decision making if reliable data on personnel in terms of job families is collected.

iv. Retiring personnel in a number of ministries/departments are substantial and this presents two sets of implications. At one level losing experienced high level personnel entails unquantifiable costs as new recruits will require training and on the job skills. At the same time it presents ministries/departments the opportunity to align their personnel requirement in line with their current and future challenges.

v. The Commission recommends that the Department of Posts budget and account for remuneration of Gramin Dak Sevaks under a head distinct from Salaries, as they are not reckoned as Central Government employees.

vi. For the purposes of transparency and availability of information in the public domain, it is recommended that a separate Object head may be created to capture expenditure on Allowances in Civil, Defence, Railways and Posts.

vii. The Commission is of the view that a clear guidance from the government on jobs that can and should be contracted out would be appropriate. While doing so the concerns of confidentiality and accountability may be kept in view. Further, to bring about continuity and to address the concerns regarding exploitation of contractual manpower, uniform guidelines/model contract agreements may be devised by the government.

viii. The Commission is also of the view that a database should be available with the government which can enable it to draw upon high level retiring personnel, who have subject matter knowledge, experience and skills to be utilised through contractual appointments.
 
Annexures to Chapter 3
Annex 1: Sanctioned Strength, Persons in Position and Vacancies as on 01.01.2014
Sl.
No.
Name of Ministry/Department
Sanctioned
Strength as
on
01.01.2014
Persons in
Position
(PIP) as on
01.01.2014
Vacancies
as on
01.01.2014
Vacancies
as a percent
of
Sanctioned
Strength
1
Ministry of Agriculture
9,561
7,679
1,882
20
2
Department of Atomic Energy
36,806
32,330
4,476
12
3
Ministry of AYUSH
275
162
113
41
4
Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers
737
570
167
23
5
Ministry of Civil Aviation
1,757
977
780
44
6
Ministry of Coal
415
305
110
27
7
Ministries of Commerce and Industry
5,187
3,771
1,416
27
8
Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
2,60,488
1,97,872
62,616
24
of which Department of Posts
2,49,588
1,89,771
59,817
24
9
Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
2,584
1,775
809
31
10
Ministry of Corporate Affairs
2,361
1,411
950
40
11
Ministry of Culture
11,193
7,979
3,214
29
12
Ministry of Defence (Civil)
5,85,476
3,98,422
1,87,054
32
13
Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region
341
259
82
24
14
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
125
78
47
38
15
Ministry of Earth Sciences
7,398
5,214
2,184
30
16
Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change
4,871
3,083
1,788
37
17
Ministry of External Affairs
4,577
3,037
1,540
34
18
Ministry of Finance
1,76,260
95,863
80,397
46
of which
Central Board of Direct Taxes
78,544
42,069
36,475
46
Central Board of Excise and Customs
73,853
50,912
22,941
31
19
Ministry of Food Processing Industries
149
114
35
23
20
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
29,463
21,061
8,402
29
21
Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
372
246
126
34
22
Ministry of Home Affairs
9,71,875
9,02,631
69,244
7
23
Ministry of Human Resources Development
1,909
1,246
663
35
24
Ministry of Information and Broadcasting
6,696
4,485
2,211
33
25
Ministry of Labour and Employment
6,816
4,953
1,863
27
26
Ministry of Law and Justice
2,018
1,416
602
30
27
Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
2,692
1,880
812
30
28
Ministry of Mines
14,069
9,116
4,953
35
29
Ministry of Minority Affairs
249
148
101
41
30
Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
300
187
113
38
31
Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs
188
118
70
37
32
Ministry of Panchayati Raj
114
82
32
28
33
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs
159
123
36
23
34
Ministry of Personnel Public Grievances and Pensions (including CVC)
8,776
7,449
1,327
15
35
Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
301
230
71
24
36
NITI Aayog
1,836
1,279
557
30
37
Ministry of Power
1,895
1,044
851
45
38
Ministry of Road, Transport and Highways
1,999
1,706
293
15
39
Ministry of Rural Development
653
476
177
27
40
Ministry of Science and Technology
12,503
6,680
5,823
47
41
Ministry of Shipping
2,934
1,885
1,049
36
42
Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
645
492
153
24
43
Department of Space
18,412
15,011
3,401
18
44
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
5,987
4,198
1,789
30
45
Ministry of Steel
263
210
53
20
46
Ministry of Textiles
3,789
3,095
694
18
47
Ministry of Tourism
583
500
83
14
48
Ministry of Tribal Affairs
307
197
110
36
49
*Ministry of Urban Development
(including Housing and Urban Poverty
Alleviation
42,675
30,665
12,010
28
50
Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation
15,697
11,051
4,646
30
51
Ministry of Women and Child Development
698
519
179
26
52
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
458
281
177
39
53
Ministry of Railways
15,51,215
13,15,688
2,35,527
15
54
Union Public Service Commission
1,990
1,464
526
26
55
Indian Audit and Accounts Department
68,374
48,164
20,210
30
56
Election Commission
641
365
276
43
Total (excluding UTs and Delhi Police)
38,90,112
31,61,242
7,28,870
19
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
29,915
27,516
2,399
8
Chandigarh
31,153
25,200
5,953
19
Dadra Nagar Haveli
3,761
3,025
736
20
Daman and Diu
3,465
2,316
1,149
33
Lakshadweep
5,765
4,754
1,011
18
Delhi Police
84536
77483
7,053
8
Grand Total
40,48,707
33,01,536
7,47,171
18

(i) Departments, within Ministries, with larger than one percent of total Person in Position(PIP) of Central Government have been distinctly included in Annex 1 to 5.

(ii) *Ministry of Urban Development is also the Cadre Controlling Ministry in respect of Personnel in the Ministry of Housing and Poverty Alleviation (HUPA).

Annex 2: Persons in Position over the Years
Sl.
No.
Name of Ministry/Department
Persons in
Position as
on
01.01.2006
Persons in
Position as
on
01.01.2010
Change
between
2006-2010
Persons in
Position as
on
01.01.2014
Change
between
2010-2014
1
Ministry of Agriculture
9,517
8,388
-1,129
7,679
-709
2
Department of Atomic Energy
32,964
32,170
-794
32,330
160
3
Ministry of AYUSH
162
162
0
162
0
4
Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers
745
631
-114
570
-61
5
Ministry of Civil Aviation
1,322
1,272
-50
977
-295
6
Ministry of Coal
331
321
-10
305
-16
7
Ministry of Commerce and Industry
4,680
4,180
-500
3,771
-409
8
Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
2,25,418
2,03,251
-22,167
1,97,872
-5,379
of which Department of Posts
2,17,808
1,95,883
-21,925
1,89,771
-6,112
9
Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
2,211
2,015
-196
1,775
-240
10
Ministry of Corporate Affairs
1,519
1,443
-76
1,411
-32
11
Ministry of Culture
7,993
8,084
91
7,979
-105
12
Ministry of Defence (Civil)
4,51,163
4,19,943
-31,220
3,98,422
-21,521
13
Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region
232
258
26
259
1
14
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
0
67
67
78
11
15
Ministry of Earth Sciences
6,732
6,062
-670
5,214
-848
16
Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change
4,350
5,081
731
3,083
-1,998
17
Ministry of External Affairs
1,806
2,792
986
3,037
245
18
Ministry of Finance
1,05,193
1,02,957
-2,236
95,863
-7,094
of which
Central Board of Direct Taxes
43,157
42,346
-811
42,069
-277
Central Board of Excise and Customs
58,338
57,315
-1,023
50,912
-6,403
19
Ministry of Food Processing Industries
229
111
-118
114
3
20
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare #
21,061
21,061
0
21,061
0
21
Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
284
299
15
246
-53
22
Ministry of Home Affairs (including Delhi Police)
7,44,067
8,13,051
68,984
9,80,114
1,67,063
23
Ministry of Human Resource Development
1,640
1,460
-180
1,246
-214
24
Ministry of Information and Broadcasting
5,528
5,013
-515
4,485
-528
25
Ministry of Labour And
Employment
6,001
5,183
-818
4,953
-230
26
Ministry of Law and Justice
1,683
1,544
-139
1,416
-128
27
Ministry of Micro, Small And Medium Enterprises
1,933
1,927
-6
1,880
-47
28
Ministry of Mines
12,214
10,081
-2,133
9,116
-965
29
Ministry of Minority Affairs
186
163
-23
148
-15
30
Ministry of New And Renewable Energy
256
262
6
187
-75
31
Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs
146
146
0
118
-28
32
Ministry of Panchayati Raj
52
78
26
82
4
33
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs
149
129
-20
123
-6
34
Ministry of Personnel, Public
Grievances and Pensions
(including CVC)
6,663
6,988
325
7,449
461
35
Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
269
264
-5
230
-34
36
NITI Aayog
1,496
1,362
-134
1,279
-83
37
Ministry of Power
1,768
1,343
-425
1,044
-299
38
Ministry of Road, Transport and Highways
3,265
1,334
-1,931
1,706
372
39
Ministry of Rural Development
599
510
-89
476
-34
40
Ministry of Science and Technology
10,173
8,346
-1,827
6,680
-1,666
41
Ministry of Shipping
2,701
2,207
-494
1,885
-322
42
Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
536
516
-20
492
-24
43
Department of Space
14,679
14,780
101
15,011
231
44
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
4,619
4,077
-542
4,198
121
45
Ministry of Steel
199
250
51
210
-40
46
Ministry of Textiles
5,097
4,990
-107
3,095
-1,895
47
Ministry of Tourism
579
560
-19
500
-60
48
Ministry of Tribal Affairs
216
219
3
197
-22
49
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
23,661
26,377
2,716
27,516
1,139
50
Chandigarh
19,371
24,308
4,937
25,200
892
51
Dadra Nagar Haveli
2,860
3,266
406
3,025
-241
52
Daman and Diu
2,839
2,371
-468
2,316
-55
53
Lakshadweep
5,472
5,316
-156
4,754
-562
54
*Ministry of Urban
Development (including
Housing and Urban Poverty
Alleviation)
36,517
29,970
-6,547
30,665
695
55
Ministry of Water Resources,
River Development and Ganga
Rejuvenation
14,164
12,500
-1,664
11,051
-1,449
56
Ministry of Women and Child Development
645
572
-73
519
-53
57
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
350
337
-13
281
-56
58
Ministry of Railways
14,11,913
13,71,133
-40,780
13,15,688
-55,445
59
Union Public Service Commission
1,718
1,651
-67
1,464
-187
60
Indian Audit and Accounts Department
49,283
45,478
-3,805
48,164
2,686
61
Election Commission
327
319
-8
365
46
GRAND TOTAL
32,73,746
32,30,929
-42,817
33,01,536
70,607
#Ministry of Health has provided data only for the year 2014. For consistency these figures have been adopted for the years 2006 and 2010.
*Ministry of Urban Development is also the Cadre Controlling Ministry in respect of Personnel in the Ministry of Housing and Poverty Alleviation (HUPA).

Annex 3: Post 01.01.2004 Recruitment over the Post 01.01.2004 Recruitment over the Years
Sl.
No.
Name of Ministry/ Department
Post
01.01.2004
Recruits,
as on
01.01.2006
Post
01.01.2004
Recruits,
as on
01.01.2010
Recruitment
between
2006-2010
Post
01.01.2004
Recruits,
as on
01.01.2014
Recruitment
between
2010-2014
1
Ministry of Agriculture
839
984
145
1,359
375
2
Department of Atomic Energy
3,211
6,681
3,470
9,999
3,318
3
Ministry of AYUSH
0
4
4
4
0
4
Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers
3
27
24
70
43
5
Ministry of Civil Aviation
9
23
14
49
26
6
Ministry of Coal
3
7
4
12
5
7
Ministry of Commerce and Industry
98
206
108
410
204
8
Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
21,320
30,315
8,995
53,586
23,271
of which Department of Posts
21,220
29,679
8,459
52,263
22,584
9
Ministry of Consumer
Affairs, Food and Public
Distribution
35
148
113
293
145
10
Ministry of Corporate Affairs
90
117
27
335
218
11
Ministry of Culture
461
851
390
1,235
384
12
Defence (Civil)
38,853
62,094
23,241
1,02,303
40,209
13
Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region
13
21
8
44
23
14
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
0
67
67
78
11
15
Ministry of Earth Sciences
51
93
42
144
51
16
Ministry of Environment , Forests and Climate Change
97
394
297
875
481
17
Ministry of External Affairs
256
396
140
966
570
18
Ministry of Finance
6,281
17,913
11,632
31,351
13,438
of which
Central Board of Direct Taxes
2,398
7,058
4,660
11,686
4,628
Central Board of Excise and Customs
3,740
10,577
6,837
19,069
8,492
19
Ministry of Food Processing Industries
0
1
1
10
9
20
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
0
699
699
21
Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
0
4
4
8
4
22
Ministry of Home Affairs(including Delhi Police)
1,02,773
2,42,799
1,40,026
4,65,959
2,23,160
23
Ministry of Human Resource Development
176
180
4
238
58
24
Ministry of Information and Broadcasting
1,231
1,211
-20
1,135
-76
25
Ministry of Labour And Employment
456
595
139
835
240
26
Ministry of Law and Justice
0
0
0
0
0
27
Ministry of Micro, Small And Medium Enterprises
183
79
-104
140
61
28
Ministry of Mines
288
764
476
2,404
1,640
29
Ministry of Minority Affairs
6
9
3
7
-2
30
Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
0
0
0
34
34
31
Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs
0
19
19
18
-1
32
Ministry of Panchayati Raj
0
4
4
10
6
33
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs
5
10
5
20
10
34
Ministry of Personnel, Public
Grievances and Pensions
(including CVC)
184
1,051
867
1,773
722
35
Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
15
15
0
21
6
36
NITI Aayog
443
537
94
640
103
37
Ministry of Power
12
127
115
198
71
38
Ministry of Road Transport
1,541
221
-1,320
365
144
and Highways
39
Ministry of Rural Development
40
Ministry of Science and Technology
495
717
222
700
-17
41
Ministry of Shipping
288
424
136
487
63
42
Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
1
5
4
74
69
43
Department of Space
1,676
3,617
1,941
5,696
2,079
44
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
771
1,059
288
1,692
633
45
Ministry of Steel
6
5
-1
7
2
46
Ministry of Textiles
159
225
66
364
139
47
Ministry of Tourism
0
0
0
85
85
48
Ministry of Tribal Affairs
48
51
3
29
-22
49
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
2,171
2,299
128
4,362
2,063
50
Chandigarh
620
2,033
1,413
2,743
710
51
Dadra Nagar Haveli
56
521
465
379
-142
52
Daman and Diu
1,786
1,467
-319
1,475
8
53
Lakshadweep
1,592
1,370
-222
1,831
461
54
Ministry of Urban
Development (including
Housing and Urban Poverty
Alleviation)
272
807
535
3,980
3,173
55
*Ministry of Water
Resources, River
Development and Ganga
Rejuvenation
541
1,387
846
2,722
1,335
56
Ministry of Women and Child Development
4
15
11
74
59
57
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
1
3
2
19
16
58
Ministry of Railways
65,288
1,55,917
90,629
3,96,260
2,40,343
59
Union Public Service Commission
50
137
87
274
137
60
Indian Audit and Accounts Department
781
2,417
1,636
12,297
9,880
61
Election Commission
22
34
12
86
52
Grand Total
2,55,565
5,42,504
2,86,939
11,13,329
5,70,825
*Ministry of Urban Development is also the Cadre Controlling Ministry in respect of Personnel in the Ministry of Housing and Poverty Alleviation (HUPA)

Annex 4: Composition of Personnel in various Groups (`A’, `B’, `C’)
Sl.
No.
Name of Ministry/
Department
Persons in Position (PIP) as on 01.01.2014
Percentage of Total
Gr. A
Gr. B
Gr. C
Total
Gr. A Gr. B
Gr. C
1
Ministry of Agriculture
606
2,123
4,950
7,679
8
28
64
2
Department of Atomic Energy
8,515
12,404
11,411
32,330
27
38
35
3
Ministry of AYUSH
59
42
61
162
36
26
38
4
Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers
91
191
288
570
16
34
51
5
Ministry of Civil Aviation
396
163
418
977
41
17
43
6
Ministry of Coal
40
102
163
305
13
33
53
7
Ministry of Commerce and Industry
802
1,171
1,798
3,771
21
31
48
8
Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
4,395
8,980
1,84,497
1,97,872
2
5
93
of which Department of Posts
527
6,826
1,82,418
1,89,771
0
4
96
9 Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
227
527
1,021
1,775
13
30
58
10 Ministry of Corporate Affairs
385
488
538
1,411
27
35
38
11
Ministry of Culture
241
872
6,866
7,979
3
11
86
12 Ministry of Defence(Civil)
17,160
59,415
3,21,847
3,98,422
4
15
81
13 Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region
54
86
119
259
21
33
46
14
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
19
40
19
78
24
51
15
Ministry of Earth Sciences
313
2,975
1,926
5,214
6
57
37
16
Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change
665
707
1,711
3,083
22
23
55
17
Ministry of External Affairs
1,130
1,156
751
3,037
37
38
25
18
Ministry of Finance
5,847
40,925
49,091
95,863
6
43
51
of which
Central Board of Direct Taxes
3,375
5,765
32,929
42,069
8
14
78
Central Board of Excise and Customs
2,056
34,150
14,706
50,912
4
67
29
19
Ministry of Food Processing Industries
42
30
42
114
37
26
37
20
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
2,997
4,972
13,092
21,061
14
24
62
21
Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
69
80
97
246
28
33
39
22
Ministry of Home Affairs (including Delhi Police)
16,090
60,162
9,03,862
9,80,114
2
6
92
23
Ministry of Human Resource Development
215
509
522
1,246
17
41
42
24
Ministry of Information and Broadcasting
304
958
3,223
4,485
7
21
72
25
Ministry of Labour and Employment
826
895
3,232
4,953
17
18
65
26
Ministry of Law and Justice
190
412
814
1,416
13
29
58
27
Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
240
618
1,022
1,880
13
33
54
28
Ministry of Mines
2,483
692
5,941
9,116
27
8
65
29
Ministry of Minority Affairs
38
48
62
148
26
32
42
30
Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
80
35
72
187
43
19
39
31
Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs
26
40
52
118
22
34
44
32
Ministry of Panchayati Raj
30
31
21
82
37
38
33
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs
21
39
63
123
17
32
51
34
Ministry of Personnel,
Public Grievances and
Pensions (including
CVC)
855
1,978
4,616
7,449
11
27
62
35
Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
51
103
76
230
22
45
33
36
NITI Aayog
391
423
465
1,279
31
33
36
37
Ministry of Power
323
313
408
1,044
31
30
39
38
Ministry of Road Transport and Highways
303
438
965
1,706
18
26
57
39
Ministry of Rural Development
117
203
156
476
25
43
33
40
Ministry of Science and Technology
402
2,059
4,219
6,680
6
31
63
41
Ministry of Shipping
185
560
1,140
1,885
10
30
60
42
Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
83
163
246
492
17
33
50
43
Department of Space
8,555
3,416
3,040
15,011
57
23
20
44
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
393
2,842
963
4,198
9
68
23
45
Ministry of Steel
39
86
85
210
19
41
40
46
Ministry of Textiles
145
749
2,201
3,095
5
24
71
47
Ministry of Tourism
64
103
333
500
13
21
67
48
Ministry of Tribal Affairs
49
62
86
197
25
31
44
49
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
614
7,351
19,551
27,516
2
27
71
50
Chandigarh
1,975
3,925
19,300
25,200
8
16
77
51
Dadra Nagar Haveli
47
1,902
1,076
3,025
2
63
36
52
Daman and Diu
56
1,371
889
2,316
2
59
38
53
Lakshadweep
40
1,288
3,426
4,754
1
27
72
54
*Ministry of Urban Development (including Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation)
1,539
6,967
22,159
30,665
5
23
72
55
Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation
1,237
2,391
7,423
11,051
11
22
67
56
Ministry of Women and Child Development
82
154
283
519
16
30
55
57
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
35
87
159
281
12
31
57
58
Ministry of Railways
8,493
7,283
12,99,912
13,15,688
<1
<1
99
59
Union Public Service Commission
157
527
780
1,464
11
36
53
60
Indian Audit and Accounts Department
605
32,105
15,454
48,164
1
67
32
61
Election Commission
70
155
140
365
19
42
38
GRAND TOTAL
91,501
2,80,892
29,29,143
33,01,536
3
9
89
*Ministry of Urban Development is also the Cadre Controlling Ministry in respect of Personnel in the Ministry of Housing and Poverty Alleviation (HUPA)

Annex 5: Age Profile of Persons in Position as on 01.01.2014
Sl. No.
Name of Ministry/ Department
≥ 20 and
< 30 yrs.
≥ 30 and
< 40 yrs.
≥ 40 and
< 50 yrs.
≥ 50 and
< 60 yrs.
Others
Total
1
Ministry of Agriculture
837
1,012
2,530
3,298
2
7,679
2
Department of Atomic Energy
4,177
7,735
9,228
11,136
54
32,330
3
Ministry of AYUSH
10
20
50
84
0
164
4
Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers
47
106
220
197
0
570
5
Ministry of Civil Aviation
161
88
288
439
1
977
6
Ministry of Coal
11
20
78
196
0
305
7
Ministry of Commerce and Industry
118
486
1,337
1,830
0
3,771
8
Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
28,833
30,140
54,632
80,933
493
1,95,031
of which Department of Posts
28,370
29,333
52,289
79,295
484
1,89,771
9
Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
197
247
515
817
0
1,776
10
Ministry of Corporate Affairs
161
337
499
411
3
1,411
11
Ministry of Culture
325
1,504
2,647
3,502
1
7,979
12
Ministry of Defence (Civil)
48,849
91,303
1,06,256
1,51,161
853
3,98,422
13
Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region
24
40
79
113
3
259
14
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
11
14
23
30
0
78
15
Ministry of Earth Sciences
309
370
2,274
2,258
3
5,214
16
Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change
78
458
1,390
1,154
3
3,083
17
Ministry of External Affairs
282
495
1,060
1,200
0
3,037
18
Ministry of Finance
9,603
16,877
36,019
33,307
57
95,863
of which
Central Board of Direct Taxes
4,987
7,593
16,339
13,132
18
42,069
Central Board of Excise and Customs
4,375
8,863
18,634
19,040
0
50,912
19
Ministry of Food Processing Industries
4
13
43
54
0
114
20
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
2,019
3,982
7,225
7,296
539
21,061
21
Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
10
24
74
138
0
246
22
Ministry of Home Affairs (including Delhi Police)
3,94,548
2,59,660
2,43,913
67,933
14,060
9,80,114
23
Ministry of Human Resource Development
77
138
405
626
0
1,246
24
Ministry of Information and Broadcasting
313
599
1,566
2,004
3
4,485
25
Ministry of Labour and Employment
342
962
1,671
1,948
30
4,953
26
Ministry of Law and Justice
83
337
459
513
24
1,416
27
Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
78
452
668
685
0
1,883
28
Ministry of Mines
1,069
1,327
2,495
4,223
2
9,116
29
Ministry of Minority Affairs
11
25
48
56
8
148
30
Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
13
24
53
97
0
187
31
Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs
5
21
36
56
0
118
32
Ministry of Panchayati Raj
3
22
26
31
0
82
33
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs
9
26
40
43
5
123
34
Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions(including CVC)
652
1,675
3,313
1,794
15
7,449
35
Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
4
28
60
138
0
230
36
NITI Aayog
1,279
37
Ministry of Power
69
125
326
523
1
1,044
38
Ministry of Road, Transport and Highways
108
417
620
557
4
1,706
39
Ministry of Rural Development
18
64
184
210
0
476
40
Ministry of Science and Technology
212
1,050
1,628
3,787
3
6,680
41
Ministry of Shipping
119
291
796
679
0
1,885
42
Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
30
131
140
190
1
492
43
Department of Space
2,854
3,993
3,196
4,764
204
15,011
44
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
842
702
1,030
1,624
0
4,198
45
Ministry of Steel
5
50
80
75
0
210
46
Ministry of Textiles
61
258
448
2,328
0
3,095
47
Ministry of Tourism
14
72
326
88
0
500
48
Ministry of Tribal Affairs
15
38
63
81
0
197
49
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
3,074
7,196
10,113
7,101
32
27,516
50
Chandigarh
5,215
4,940
7,910
7,004
131
25,200
51
Dadra Nagar Haveli
220
522
1,207
1,070
6
3,025
52
Daman and Diu
451
674
845
346
2,316
53
Lakshadweep
519
1,166
1,451
1,618
0
4,754
54
*Ministry of Urban Development (including Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation)
1,371
2,212
8,120
18,962
0
30,665
55
Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation
724
1,077
3,239
6,011
0
11,051
56
Ministry of Women and Child Development
52
70
149
248
0
519
57
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
16
81
53
124
7
281
58
Ministry of Railways
2,16,355
2,80,517
3,20,262
4,93,609
4,945
13,15,688
59
Union Public Service Commission
149
156
522
634
3
1,464
60
Indian Audit and Accounts Department
7,087
8,233
16,616
16,188
40
48,164
61
Election Commission
49
87
164
64
1
365
GRAND TOTAL
7,32,902
7,34,689
8,60,708
9,47,586
21,537
32,98,701
*Ministry of Urban Development is also the Cadre Controlling Ministry in respect of Personnel in the Ministry of Housing and Poverty Alleviation (HUPA)

Annex A: Data Template for ministries/departments issued from 7th Central CPC (CPC)


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